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RH1002 LibGuide: Assessment 1: Online Quiz

ASSESSMENT 1. Online Quiz Citations and Referencing

This assessment will test your ability to write citations and references. You must complete a 20 minute online quiz, available on Learn JCU.  Below are some links for videos and Libguides on APA and AMA styles.

Introduction to APA interactive tutorial

APA Referencing

The APA LibGuide will give you more examples.  So please have a look at this before your assignment..

APA reference lists interactive tutorial

APA Referencing

The APA LibGuide will give you more examples.  So please have a look at this before your assignment..

Basic APA 6th examples

Titles - only use a capital letter for the first letter of the Title, Sub-title (if there is one) and any Proper Nouns (names).
Journal Titles are the exception; capitalise all major words in Journal Titles.

Frogmouth, T., & Drongo, S. (2013). Think like a cat: Mouse dreams in Australia. Journal of Crazy Chooks, 17(4), 26-32. doi:10.1037/1061

Frogmouth, T., & Drongo, S. (2013). Think Like A Cat: Mouse Dreams In Australia. Journal of Crazy Chooks, 17(4), 26-32. doi:10.1037/1061

Frogmouth, T., & Drongo, S. (2013). Think like a cat: Mouse dreams in Australia. Journal of crazy chooks, 17(4), 26-32. doi:10.1037/1061

  Book

Author, A. A. (year). Title: Subtitle. Location: Publisher.

Frogmouth, T. (2013). Think like a cat: Mouse dreams. Birdsville, FL: Crazy Chook Press.

Frogmouth, T. (2013). Think like a cat: Mouse dreams. Birdsville, Australia: Crazy Chook Press.

  Journal article

Author, A. A., & Author, B. B. (Year). Title of article: Subtitle. Title of Journal, volume number(issue number), pp-pp. doi or URL if available

Frogmouth, T., & Drongo, S. (2013). Think like a cat: Mouse dreams. Journal of Crazy Chooks, 17(4), 26-32. doi:10.1037/1061

Frogmouth, T., & Drongo, S. (2013). Think like a cat: Mouse dreams. Journal of Crazy Chooks, 17(4), 26-32. http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/1061-4087.45.2.10

Frogmouth, T., & Drongo, S. (2013). Think like a cat: Mouse dreams. Journal of Crazy Chooks, 17(4), 26-32. Retrieved from http://www.electrochook.com

Frogmouth, T., & Drongo, S. (2013). Think like a cat: Mouse dreams. Journal of Crazy Chooks, 17(4), 6-32.

  Book chapter

Author, A. A., & Author, B. B. (year). Title of chapter: Subtitle. In A. Editor & B. Editor (Eds.), Title of book: Subtitle (pages of chapter). Location: Publisher.

Frogmouth, T., & Drongo, S. (2013). Wriggley worms: A guide. In M. Sunbird, J. Sparrow, & D. Whitetail. (Eds.), Think like a cat (pp. 22-34). Birdsville, FL: Crazy Chook Press.

Frogmouth, T., & Drongo, S. (2013). Wriggley worms: A guide. In M. Sunbird, J. Sparrow, & D. Whitetail. (Eds.), Think like a cat (pp. 22-34). Birdsville, England: Crazy Chook Press.

  Webpage

Author, A.A. (Date of publication). Title of webpage. Retrieved from URL

Frogmouth, T. (2013). Think like a cat: Mouse dreams. Retrieved from http://www.electrochook/thinkcat.html

  Web documents, for example PDF

Author, A.A. (Date of publication). Title of webpage. Retrieved from URL

Frogmouth, T. (2013). Think like a cat: Mouse dreams. Retrieved from http://www.electrochook/thinkcat.pdf

In-Text Citations

Using references in text

For APA, you use the authors' surnames and the year of publication in text. If you are using a direct quote, you will also need to use a page number (you may be asked to use a page number for all of your citations - check with your lecturer).

For 1 or 2 authors, you will always use the names of both authors:

Frogmouth and Spoonbill (2013) found that "the mice disappeared within minutes" (pp. 29-30).

The author stated "the mice disappeared within minutes" (Frogmouth & Spoonbill, 2013, p. 29).

For 3 - 5 authors, you will need to use the names of all authors the first time, but from then on you can shorten the reference to the first author and "et al.":

First time:

Frogmouth, Spoonbill, and Drongo (2013) found that "the mice disappeared within minutes" (pp. 29-30).

The author stated "the mice disappeared within minutes" (Frogmouth, Spoonbill, & Drongo, 2013, p. 29).

Subsequently:

Frogmouth et al. (2013) found that "the mice disappeared within minutes" (pp. 29-30).

The author stated "the mice disappeared within minutes" (Frogmouth et al., 2013, p. 29).

For 6 or more authors, you usually cite the first author, and then abbreviate with "et al.":

Frogmouth et al. (2013) found that "the mice disappeared within minutes" (pp. 29-30).

The author stated "the mice disappeared within minutes" (Frogmouth et al., 2013, p. 29).

This may change if you have several groups of authors with the same first author, but check with your librarian if you're not sure.

Introduction to AMA Vancouver interactive tutorial

AMA Referencing

The AMA Libguide has many more examples.  Please have a look at this libguide before your assignment.

AMA quick view

Please note:  The Skeleton Guide is a brief version of the guide for quick reference.  See the other pages on this guide for more comprehensive information.

AMA (Vancouver) Skeleton Guide for JCU students

The following guidelines are based on the minimum requirements for AMA citations.  AMA style requires this core information for each citation (additional details can be added where appropriate – see the relevant pages in the full JCU AMA guide).

Pay close attention to the punctuation use in these examples – including case, italics, the order of dates and spaces.

Journals

  1. Author(s). Article title. Journal Abbreviation. Year;vol(issue no.):inclusive pages. DOI or URL [if online]. Accessed date [only if using URL].

Examples:

  1. Economopoulos KJ, Brockmeier SF. Rotator cuff tears in overhead athletes. Clin Sports Med. 2012;31(4):675-692.
  2. Lenza M, Buchbinder R, Christensen R, Hanchard Nigel CA, Faloppa F. Magnetic resonance imaging versus ultrasonography for assessing rotator cuff tears in patients with shoulder pain for whom surgery is being considered. Cochrane Database of Syst Rev. 2011;(3):CD009020. doi:10.1002/14651858.CD009020.
  3. Finnan RP, Crosby LA. Partial-thickness rotator cuff tears. J Shoulder Elbow Surg. 2010;19(4):609-616. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1058274609004662. Accessed April 26, 2012.

Books (whole book)

  1. Author(s) or Editor(s) [if editors, include ed or eds]. Book Title. Edition number [if not the first edition]. City, State [if American] or Country of publisher: Publisher’s name; Copyright year. DOI or URL [if online]. Accessed date [only if using URL].

Examples:

  1. Laccetti MS, Kazanowski MK. Pain Management. Sudbury, MA: Jones and Bartlett Publishers; 2009.
  2. Vadivelu N, Urman RD, Hines RL, eds. Essentials of Pain Management. New York, NY: Springer New York; 2011. doi:10.1007/978-0-387-87579-8_2.

Book chapter

  1. Author(s) of chapter. Title of chapter. In: Editor(s), ed. or eds. Title of Book. Edition number [if not the first edition]. City, State [if American] or Country of publisher: Publisher’s name; Copyright year:inclusive pages. DOI or URL [if online]. Accessed date [only if using URL].

Examples:

  1. Dog TL. Botanicals in the management of pain. In: Audette JF, Bailey A, eds. Contemporary Pain Medicine: Integrative Pain Medicine: the Science and Practice of Complementary and Alternative Medicine in Pain Management. Totowa, NJ: Humana Press; 2008:447-470.
  2. Shaparin N, Shah A, Gritsenko K. Pharmacological agents: opioids. In: Urman RD, Vadivelu N, eds. Perioperative Pain Management. Oxford, England: Oxford University Press; 2013:29-37. http://jcu.eblib.com.au/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1274300. Accessed November 25, 2012.
  3. Fikremariam D, Serafini M. Multidisciplinary approach to pain management. In: Vadivelu N, Urman RD, Hines RL, eds. Essentials of Pain Management. New York, NY: Springer New York; 2011:17-28. doi:10.1007/978-0-387-87579-8_2.

Web pages

  1. Author(s) [or organisation responsible for the site]. Title of page or object. Name of website. URL. Published [or Updated] date [at least the year, if available]. Accessed date.

Examples:

  1. State Government of Victoria. Anaphylaxis. Better Health Channel. http://www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au/bhcv2/bhcarticles.nsf/pages/Anaphylaxis. Updated July 16, 2013. Accessed January 8, 2014.
  2. Queensland Health. Food safety fact sheet 51: Food allergies. Queensland Health website. http://www.health.qld.gov.au/foodsafety/Documents/fs-51-allergies.pdf. Published 2013. Accessed January 12, 2014.

In text numbering

Superscript numbers

The numbers in text are in superscript1 and occur at the end of the clause in which you used the information.  They occur outside “quotation marks,”2 commas,3 (parentheses)4 and full stops.5 However, they occur inside semicolons6; and colons7:

Do not leave a space between the last letter or punctuation mark and the number.

Re-use numbers for the same citation

Citations should be numbered sequentially – that is, the first source you cite is 1, the second source is 2 and so on.

However, once you have given a source a number, it will keep that number throughout your paper. So, if you use your first source again, no matter how often you use it, it is still 1.

Citing more than one work at a time

Use commas to show that more than one work is being cited, and use hyphens for several works that would be numbered sequentially:

These side effects can have implications for the patient's mental health, as numerous studies have shown.1,3,6-9

Relationship between in-text citations and reference list

Your reference list follows the order of the numbers used in the text. The first source you cite in the text is 1 and the reader will look for number 1 in the reference list to find the full citation; the fifth source you use is 5 and the full citation is listed at number 5 in the reference list (and so on).

Your Librarians

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