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CS1022 Learning in a digital environment Guide: Digiexplanations

Scripting your Presentation

Presentations need to have a clear introduction outlining what you are going to talk about and a great conclusion to remind your audience what you just talked about. The introduction sets the scene and the conclusion closes the door. Everything else is summated in the main body of the presentation.

Writing a script for your presentation aids in clarifying your outline, reinforces your ideas and memory, and guides you through your speech. 

Scripts need to be:

  • Your main points only - although you may include great quotation, statistics or facts
  • Clear and concise
  • Easy to pronounce - words, discipline terminology
  • Visible for you to read - consider font, size and colour 
  • Presented NOT read from.

A script is NOT your PowerPoint Presentation or Prezi. This should only focus on key words, images or quotations and should not, in the main, be a duplicate of your script.

A script is meant only as a guide NOT as a crutch for you to solely rely upon. Rather all presentations should be rehearsed and rehearsed. The script is for you to refer to when you lose your way, need reassurance, or need to refer to a quote/stats/fact. Even if you have one, only refer to it on an 'as needs' basis. Remember your lecturer wants to see/hear you presenting not you reading. Having a script will help you feel prepared physically and, hopefully, mentally.

So ... Plan, Prepare, Practice and Present!

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